Ask Martin: A Bucking Habit

//Ask Martin: A Bucking Habit

Ask Martin: A Bucking Habit

Question: “So i started a three-year old-gelding this Spring who I’m pretty sure is proud cut. I put about 20 or so rides on him and he was doing great. I recently moved to a new place and started using him and now he bucks when I saddle him. After he quits bucking, he’s usually fine but just the other day he bucked me off. What do you think is going on with this horse?”

 

 

Answer: “Being proud cut should have very little, if any, effect on the training unless there are other horses, especially mares, around.

 

Not sure changing locations would have any affect either, but if he never bucked in 20 rides and started bucking, something changed. If he only bucks when you first get started and not later in the ride, it sounds like the problem is getting started off properly. Once they get a pattern of bucking at a certain point or time, you can take away what’s causing the problem but the habit can still be there.

 

My first thought is he may have gotten sore, you could’ve possibly cinched him tighter, or cut back on some of the preparation before getting on that you were doing before. Feed could also be a factor if he is on rich green grass now. Something along this line may have changed what you had working.

 

But without anymore information from you or seeing the horse, it would be a shot in the dark to give you a specific answer because you likely have a specific problem. What’s exactly right for one situation could be exactly wrong for the next.

 

My first idea would be that he’s cinchy, and, if so, walk him around as you’re cinching him and give a little tug on the latigo every few steps until it is snug enough.

 

Another idea is just warm him up more before riding. He might just be too fresh. You can do some exercises to engage his mind as he burns energy, or just running around and burn up some energy. At some point he’ll be too tired to buck.

 

Get his hindquarters supple enough and keep them supple when you’re on him, and, if you suspect he’s getting ready to do something, you can keep him from bucking by stepping his hindquarters out where he can’t get the drive.

 

The more experience the person has with horses the less experience the horse needs to get by. The less experience person has with horses the more experience the horse needs to get by. The more experience you have, the more judgement and ability you gain.

 

Thanks for your question,

 

Martin”
2016-11-04T16:08:39+00:00 On The Road|